FT August 2015

Family Tree magazine August 2015

Family Tree August 2015 is on sale now! This issue we’re inspiring you to reach out to your cousins worldwide, to make new connections and see your tree bloom as a result! Also inside this issue… Ancestry’s DNA test; Royal Navy in WWI; copyright law; dating photo mounts; oral history; Jacobites; pocket contents; semaphore; Great War women; your stories; & much, much more… Plus, free access to selected records at TheGenealogist! You can download the digital edition right now – click here! Simple steps to connect with your cousins worldwide! Discover how to unearth new facts, photos and family stories –

Blogging for family history

Blogging for family history

In the August issue of Family Tree, we have a fantastic article all about how to grow a bigger, better family tree, with genealogist and family history blogger Chris Paton exploring how collateral lines and cousin collaboration can boost our own research. In the article Chris reveals how a blog can be an excellent way to connect with cousins worldwide, ‘If there is one way to really foster links with others, it is to place the research that we have already established onto a website to act as “cousin bait”. The theory is that when others trawl the net to find

FT July

Family Tree magazine July 2015

Family Tree July 2015 is on sale now! Discover how to tell your ancestors’ stories with our essential guide to writing your family history – it’s easier than you think! Also inside this issue… 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain; genealogy & identity; sailors’ wills; ‘women’s issues’; the Hanseatic League; Lord Lyon King of Arms; the great British seaside; your stories; & much, much more… Plus, free access to selected records at TheGenealogist! You can download the digital edition right now – click here! Glimpses of the past Begin writing your family history by following these four easy steps. Identifying

FT June 2015

Family Tree magazine June 2015

Family Tree June 2015 is on sale now! With major anniversaries for Waterloo and Magna Carta this year, now is an inspiring time for a new family history research challenge and we have all the expert guidance you need. For the adventurous among us we have possible sources to help track down your medieval ancestors; and if you think you might have a soldier forebear involved in the Battle of Waterloo now’s the time to find out for sure. Also this issue… UKBMD updates; lost records; archive volunteers; heraldry; Salvation Army records; medieval fashions; WW1 music; lion queens; your stories;

FT & Diane Lindsay

Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2015 in pictures

Wow, what a fabulous event Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2015 was! We had a great time – the highlight being meeting lots of our wonderful readers – and we hope you enjoyed it too if you were able to make it. The NEC proved to be a fabulous new venue for the show, and the atmosphere was friendly and relaxed, so we’re pleased to know the event will be in Birmingham again next year. Thank you to everyone who stopped by our stand! Click on the images below to view them larger.

Bank of England Archive launches online catalogue

For the first time researchers from around the world can search the Bank of England’s Archive Catalogue online. More than 56,000 descriptions of records are currently available to search; records that include many named individuals and are therefore an invaluable source for family historians.

The catalogue enables researchers to identify relevant records, although it will not usually reveal specific names because records are not catalogued in this much detail, so a visit to the archive will be necessary to search the records.

The key staff records are House Lists (from 1694) and Salary Ledgers (from 1718), which together give the summary of an employee’s work. Although less extensive, the reports and minutes of the Committee of the Examination of Clerks (1799 – 1939) are a rich source of family history information, often giving details of an applicant’s schooling and work life prior to the Bank. Among other records, the archive holds detailed First World War staff records and records of the employment of porters and messengers (1892-1915). The new ‘Name Search’ is a quick and easy way to learn about senior staff. It contains brief biographies that link to all the relevant records in the catalogue.

For records of Bank customers and individual holders of government stock, there are indexed ledgers dating from 1694 (although customer accounts are not held beyond 1900). These ledgers give details of transactions so are useful for establishing the finances of an individual over time. The indexes to the stock ledgers often include the address and occupation too; however, the ledgers are arranged according to specific stock so researchers will need to know which stock was held in advance. The Bank of England will extracts can help as they detail how stockholders intended their stocks to be disposed of. The majority of these are now held by the Society of Genealogists.

Names may inadvertently appear in other records too, such as court minutes or department files, which researchers are also welcome to explore at the archive. Researchers should note, though, due to Data Protection there is a 100-year closure period on all records containing personal details of individuals.

To view the catalogue, visit http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/CalmView/.