FT Sept 2015 cover

Family Tree magazine September 2015

Family Tree September 2015 is on sale now! This issue we’re encouraging you to take those first steps with your family history, or if you’re a little further along in your journey, ways in which you can keep going! Also inside this issue… online trees; 1915 crew lists; copyright law; digitising family photos; archive film; childhood and birth order; your stories; & much, much more… Plus, free access to selected records at TheGenealogist! You can download the digital edition right now – click here! Get started, keep going! Follow in Chris Paton’s expert footsteps and start your genealogy journey today. What

FT August 2015

Family Tree magazine August 2015

Family Tree August 2015 is on sale now! This issue we’re inspiring you to reach out to your cousins worldwide, to make new connections and see your tree bloom as a result! Also inside this issue… Ancestry’s DNA test; Royal Navy in WWI; copyright law; dating photo mounts; oral history; Jacobites; pocket contents; semaphore; Great War women; your stories; & much, much more… Plus, free access to selected records at TheGenealogist! You can download the digital edition right now – click here! Simple steps to connect with your cousins worldwide! Discover how to unearth new facts, photos and family stories –

Blogging for family history

Blogging for family history

In the August issue of Family Tree, we have a fantastic article all about how to grow a bigger, better family tree, with genealogist and family history blogger Chris Paton exploring how collateral lines and cousin collaboration can boost our own research. In the article Chris reveals how a blog can be an excellent way to connect with cousins worldwide, ‘If there is one way to really foster links with others, it is to place the research that we have already established onto a website to act as “cousin bait”. The theory is that when others trawl the net to find

FT July

Family Tree magazine July 2015

Family Tree July 2015 is on sale now! Discover how to tell your ancestors’ stories with our essential guide to writing your family history – it’s easier than you think! Also inside this issue… 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain; genealogy & identity; sailors’ wills; ‘women’s issues’; the Hanseatic League; Lord Lyon King of Arms; the great British seaside; your stories; & much, much more… Plus, free access to selected records at TheGenealogist! You can download the digital edition right now – click here! Glimpses of the past Begin writing your family history by following these four easy steps. Identifying

FT June 2015

Family Tree magazine June 2015

Family Tree June 2015 is on sale now! With major anniversaries for Waterloo and Magna Carta this year, now is an inspiring time for a new family history research challenge and we have all the expert guidance you need. For the adventurous among us we have possible sources to help track down your medieval ancestors; and if you think you might have a soldier forebear involved in the Battle of Waterloo now’s the time to find out for sure. Also this issue… UKBMD updates; lost records; archive volunteers; heraldry; Salvation Army records; medieval fashions; WW1 music; lion queens; your stories;

Relationship calculator: How am I related to…?

We’re all familiar with the relationship between our direct line ancestor and ourselves, but the other branches can get a little tangled, and it’s a common query, at family gatherings or when mulling over family history matters, just how one person is related to another. You might know that the person is, for instance, your grandpa’s sister’s daughter, but what does that make her to you and vice versa? Our handy relationship calculator will help you work out precisely that – here’s how to use it.

  • First choose the most recent common ancestor that you share.
  • For your grandpa’s sister’s daughter and you, the common ancestor is your great-grandparent (her grandparent).
  • Visualise that name in the ‘common ancestor’ box.
  • Move your finger along the top row until you find your relationship to the ‘common ancestor’ (great-grandchild).
  • Then move your finger down the left-hand colunm until you find her relationship to the ‘common ancestor’ (grandchild).
  • The point at which the row and column meet show your relationship to each other – ‘first cousin once removed’!
Relationship calculator

 

Download the chart here: Relationship calculator.

Did you know?

  • Grand-nieces and grand-nephews can also be termed great-niece/great-nephew.
  • Kissing cousin is a term used for distant relations, but now you have the chart you can be more precise if you wish!
  • The word ‘removed’ indicates how many generations different one person is from another in relation to the common ancestor.
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