FT & Diane Lindsay

Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2015 in pictures

Wow, what a fabulous even Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2015 was! We had a great time – the highlight being meeting lots of our wonderful readers – and we hope you enjoyed it too if you were able to make it. The NEC proved to be a fabulous new venue for the show, and the atmosphere was friendly and relaxed, so we’re pleased to know the event will be in Birmingham again next year. Thank you to everyone who stopped by our stand! Click on the images below to view them larger. Don’t forget your free ebook! Fancy

FT May 2015

Family Tree magazine May 2015

Family Tree May 2015 is on sale now, bursting with an extravagant mix of helpful articles and research stories. We reflect on the sinking of the Lusitania, an event that had a deep impact on families far beyond those directly connected to the tragedy, plus we remember 70 years since VE day. Also inside this issue… electoral records; heraldry; Birmingham research; post-1837 marriage records; post-feudal ‘gang’ wars; American pioneers; spiritualism between the wars; your stories; & much, much more… Plus, free access to selected records at TheGenealogist! You can download the digital edition right now – click here! The final voyage of

Building Family Tree stand

Family Tree is at Who Do You Think You Are? Live

As I write this the Family Tree stand is being constructed at the NEC, Birmingham for Who Do You Think You Are? Live. The show opens its doors tomorrow for three full days of genealogy madness! We always enjoy the show and the opportunity to see many of our fabulous readers. We’re looking forward to seeing lots of you again this year and hope there will be some new faces, with those of you who have been unable to make it to the previous shows in London able to experience it for the first time. There will be much to

FT April 2015

Family Tree magazine April 2015

Family Tree April 2015 is on sale now, packed with top tips to help you grow your tree! We’re commemorating the centenary of Gallipoli this issue and our expert guide will help you trace your ancestors who played a part in this fateful campaign. Also inside this issue… achieve research success in the archives; family history societies; war memorials; early marriage records; Victorian ancestors; techy tips; your stories; & much, much more… Plus, free access to selected records at TheGenealogist! You can download the digital edition right now – click here! The Gallipoli Campaign 1915 Planning a centenary visit to Gallipoli?

FT March 2015

Family Tree magazine March 2015

Family Tree March 2015 is on sale now, revealing the riches of the parish chest! Parish records can offer clues to help us grow our tree right back to the 16th century and hold the stories of our ancestors’ wider lives – and they’re ready for researching! Also inside this issue… Genealogical indexes; Navy service records; emigrants & immigrants; WI centenary; surname origins; family history apps; mourning dress; your stories; & much, much more… Plus, free access to selected records at TheGenealogist! You can download the digital edition right now – click here! The parish chest: a review of its contents

Relationship calculator: How am I related to…?

We’re all familiar with the relationship between our direct line ancestor and ourselves, but the other branches can get a little tangled, and it’s a common query, at family gatherings or when mulling over family history matters, just how one person is related to another. You might know that the person is, for instance, your grandpa’s sister’s daughter, but what does that make her to you and vice versa? Our handy relationship calculator will help you work out precisely that – here’s how to use it.

  • First choose the most recent common ancestor that you share.
  • For your grandpa’s sister’s daughter and you, the common ancestor is your great-grandparent (her grandparent).
  • Visualise that name in the ‘common ancestor’ box.
  • Move your finger along the top row until you find your relationship to the ‘common ancestor’ (great-grandchild).
  • Then move your finger down the left-hand colunm until you find her relationship to the ‘common ancestor’ (grandchild).
  • The point at which the row and column meet show your relationship to each other – ‘first cousin once removed’!
Relationship calculator

 

Download the chart here: Relationship calculator.

Did you know?

  • Grand-nieces and grand-nephews can also be termed great-niece/great-nephew.
  • Kissing cousin is a term used for distant relations, but now you have the chart you can be more precise if you wish!
  • The word ‘removed’ indicates how many generations different one person is from another in relation to the common ancestor.
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